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Wild Rosedale

Rosedale is a wild and rugged landscape and is teeming with wildlife. In this section you will find posts relating to nature and events that celebrate our rich countryside.

Spectacular fungus

Found this beautiful Jelly ear fungus here in the dale this week. Also known as Judas’s ear fungus, Auricularia auricula-judae and commonly found on the elder tree. The story goes that Judas, the apostle who betrayed Jesus hanged himself on an elder tree. It resembles the human ear and is rubbery in texture. It ranges from purple to brown through to almost black as it ages.  Updale Natural History Recorder

Jelly ear fungus, Auricularia auricula-judae

Jelly ear fungus, Auricularia auricula-judae

The Common Kestrel or Windhover

Look at this beauty of a falcon. The common kestrel is easily picked out in that distinct hover position as it seeks it prey. This kestrel is a female or juvenile with its chestnut feathers and black barring, black wing tips and a black line at the end of its tail. A pair has raised four young and all have been ever-present this summer along the east side of the old railway line here in Rosedale. They were regularly seen hunting together, often all six hovering in a straight line. A sight to behold. Updale Natural History Recorder

Common Kestrel

Common Kestrel

Seemingly effortless hover

Wings working, tail spread, head absolutely still in a seemingly effortless hover

Dippers on the Seven

This dipper has successfully raised three chicks along with its mate here on the River Seven in Rosedale. The chicks are fed at the nest for 20-24 days before fledging but continue to be fed by both adults for a further two weeks. The young here will fledge any day now. Nature at its best. Updale Natural History Recorder

Dipper with a beak full

Dipper with a beak full

Dipper feeding young at nest

Dipper feeding young at nest

What have we in our river!

Brook lamprey are some of the most primitive vertebrates alive today and they are spawning in our river here in Rosedale right now. They are jawless, having a round sucker-like mouth and small round gill openings on the sides of the head. They have two dorsal fins and are about 15cm long. They spawn in clean gravel beds. Wonder if they know how excited Rosedale folk are about the TDY! Updale Natural History Recorder

Brook lamprey at Battlings Hill ford

Brook lamprey at Battlings Hill ford

Grey wagtail

Look out for the grey wagtails which are now back in the dale. They like fast flowing upland water and our River Seven is ideal. They have already paired up and are prospecting for nest sites, usually on a ledge close to the water or under a bridge. The grey wagtail is rather striking with its grey upper parts, yellow under parts and an extremely long tail. The constant up and down motion of its tail gives it a busy appearance. Updale Natural History Recorder

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Grey wagtail on the water

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Striking yellow under parts

Right royal fieldfare

A sure sign of winter is a flock of fieldfares in a berry-laden tree or feeding on earthworms and seeds in the fields. The fieldfare is part of the thrush family and is very distinct with a grey crown and neck, a brown back and a reddish wash down its breast. It is a winter migrant to the UK and returns north for summer breeding from March onwards. And they are now on the verge of leaving as spring is knocking on the door with the arrival of curlews in the Dale this last week, lapwings increasing in numbers and the greater spotted woodpecker drumming. Updale Natural History Recorder

Right royal fieldfare

Right royal fieldfare

Churchyard Conservation – 28 August 2014

Thanks to all the NYMNP staff and volunteers who answered the call and  helped strim and gather all the grass from the conservation area in the churchyard today, Thursday 28 August. And special thanks to Anthea Read for the outstanding cakes that helped fuel all our efforts!

The NYMNP staff and some of the local volunteers enjoying a break.

The NYMNP staff and some of the local volunteers enjoying a break.

The head strimmer at work

The head strimmer at work

An interested spectator - one of six young robins enjoying a grub and bug bonanxa!

An interested spectator – one of six young robins enjoying a grub and bug bonanza!