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Rosedale Community News

Welcome to the Rosedale blog. This is where we share news and information about events in Rosedale and the wider community throughout the year. You’ll also find news about the village timetable, our micro enterprises, school events, clubs, and lively socials.

Posts Tagged ‘North York Moors’

Green hairstreak butterfly on the wing

These beautiful small butterflies are on the wing and in small colonies on the moor here in Rosedale.  They are found on bilberry in a sunny spot with a bit of shelter from the breeze.  Males are very territorial and perch on a prominent branch awaiting passing females.  If disturbed they often return and settle on the same spot after a few frantic circuits.  However, they can be hard to spot as they are well camouflaged against the green leaves of bilberry.  Updale Natural History Recorder

Green hairstreak butterfly

Summer migrants return

Two of the earliest summer migrants come back to Rosedale each year, ring ouzels and wheatears.  Both are back on the moor and pairing up.  Ring ouzels nest on heather-clad steep slopes and wheatears favour open stoney ground.   Both can be seen from the old railway line.  Updale Natural History Recorder

Male and female ring ouzel

Female wheatear

 

Nuthatch preparing nest hole

To watch a female nuthatch preparing a nest hole is amazing.  She selects an old hole, often an old woodpecker nest hole as in this case and she transforms it.  She infills crevices and/or reduces the size of the cavity using mud and bits of rotten wood.  She will also use mud to reduce the size of the entrance to minimise the risk of predation.  The male, distinguished by chestnut red flanks, keeps guard during this process and will fend off any intruders.  Updale Natural History Recorder

Female nuthatch working on nest cavity

Nuthatch uses mud and bits of rotten wood

Tawny owl makes a welcome daylight appearance

Tawny owls are very vocal in late autumn and throughout winter but we don’t often get to see them in all their splender. How lucky local residents Bob and Janet Morton were to have a tawny owl in their garden recently, on two separate occasions. Bob has captured the warm chestnut brown feathering, distinct facial disc and somewhat dumpy appearance beautifully.  Very many thanks Updale Natural History Recorder

lighter tones underneath with distinct facial disc

warm chestnut brown feathering

Hawfinches in Rosedale

Fantastic to see these secretive and increasingly rare birds here in Rosedale.  At least five hawfinches are in and around the churchyard feeding on yew berries.  The hawfinch is the largest of our finches with a top-heavy look due to a large bill and thick neck.  With this powerful bill the hawfinch is able to crack open cherry stones.  They also feed on seeds from hornbeam and yew.  Autumn 2017 saw an unusually large influx in to the UK as a result of a crop failure in Europe and there have been a number of sightings in North Yorkshire.  But how lucky we are to get some in Rosedale and it certainly could be a first record for some time.  With great appreciation to Craig and Helen at Abbey Stores for the tip-off  and the best view of these shy birds.  Updale Natural History Recorder

Snow covered dale

Stunningly beautiful walk in the snow at dusk along the old railway line at Rosedale East.  The low mist adds to the atmospheric conditions as the light fades.  A pair of stonechats break the silence with their presence as do three wrens flitting together in the rushes  Updale Natural History Recorder