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Rosedale Community News

Welcome to the Rosedale blog. This is where we share news and information about events in Rosedale and the wider community throughout the year. You’ll also find news about the village timetable, our micro enterprises, school events, clubs, and lively socials.

Posts Tagged ‘Birds’

xA sweet reminder

It was some weeks ago now that a lady rang to say she had robins nesting in the tree trunk in her garden. Her enthusiasm was infectious. We watched. They gathered food. One oblivious to our presence on the lady’s bench, the other a little wary. We watched. They fed their young. We watched. One came and went, the other hesitated, there usually being just the lady on that bench. The lady enjoyed those two robins feeding their young so close to her on that bench. She sat each day, the sun beaming down, the robins busying themselves around her. That lady was Brenda Bowes. Updale Natural History Recorder

Fearless parent

Fearless parent

Wary parent

Wary parent

Nest with young tucked behind pansies

Nest with young tucked behind pansies

xRing Ouzels Return

Our first migrants have started to return to the uplands here in the dale. A male ring ouzel was seen on the east side on 21 March having arrived overnight along with two male wheatears. This has equalled our earliest date recorded which was in 2012. Ring ouzels spend their winter in North Africa and are one of the earliest returnees along with wheatears.

The ring ouzels are now pairing up and establishing territories. The simple and melancholy song of the male is well worth listening to as you walk around the old railway line. It is a bird in decline in England but we have seen no sign of that here in Rosedale and elsewhere on the North York Moors. A very distinctive bird with its white gorget or bib. The males are black and the females, as pictured here, are brown. Updale Natural History Recorder

Female ring ouzel

Female ring ouzel

xDippers busy refurbishing nest

The pair of dippers here in Rosedale are already refurbishing last year’s nest.  Dippers are site faithful, nesting in the same area each year.  They sometimes use the same nest and our pair are busy collecting moss from stones and the river bank and working on the nest from the inside.  They were first seen on 19 February working on the nest and there is still work to do but it is much improved from the bedraggled mess which overwintered.  They are early breeders but this does seem a little early yet.  It is not known if they stayed here in the dale over winter but one dipper was seen on 7 February in the village.  There is at least one other pair in the dale further south.  Upland Natural History Recorder
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xNuthatch

 This resident bird is quite common but still a treat to see climbing head first down a tree.  It’s strong feet enable it to do this.  It has a long straight bill which allows it to pick insects out of crevices on the bark.  The male and female have similar markings and they nest in holes in trees, often reducing the size of the entrance with mud.   Updale Natural History Recorder
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xPair of Dippers on the River Seven

A great sight to see dippers along the River Seven here in Rosedale and they are nesting already.  They can endure quite harsh conditions but there is a tendency to move downstream from upland areas in winter.  The male and female are identical in appearance.  They bob and curtsey when perched on rocks and feed on invertebrates from the river, diving, swimming and even walking along the river bed.  They tend to nest on the river bank and the nest is about the size of a football.  Upland Natural History Recorder.
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xThe Ring Ouzels Are Back

The first Ring Ouzel of the season was seen on 29 March up on the moor, having just returned from its wintering in North Africa.  A tad late this year but they have been held up due to the unseasonal bad weather.  Ring Ouzels are in decline and the North York Moors is one of just a few upland areas in England where they still breed.  Heather-clad steep slopes above 250m is ideal nesting habitat for this elusive bird.  Very similar to a blackbird but with a distinctive white bid or gorget.

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