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Rosedale Community News

Welcome to the Rosedale blog. This is where we share news and information about events in Rosedale and the wider community throughout the year. You’ll also find news about the village timetable, our micro enterprises, school events, clubs, and lively socials.

Recent Posts

White-letter hairstreak butterfly

Thrilled to find white-letter hairstreak butterfly here in Rosedale.  It is on the wing in July but not widely recorded here in the National Park.  It is a small butterfly and always rests with its wings closed showing the white hairline across its underside.  It has a white W towards the bottom tip of the hindwings which is not easily seen and orange marks along the bottom edge near the wing-tail.  They spend their time in the tops of trees and can be found on elm but more commonly now on wych elm.  They feed on aphid honeydew found on the leaves.

The best way to spot them is find a wych elm in a sunny but sheltered position and watch the canopy.  Eventually the small butterfly will flit about and land often from where it launched.  It is then easy to watch the butterfly through binoculars or photograph.  This white-letter hairstreak was seen on the wych elms at the junction of Daleside road and Knott road at Rosedale East.  It helps to have this glorious weather Updale Natural History Recorder

White-letter hairstreak at rest

White-letter hairstreak at near-by Hutton Common in 2014

 

Save Rosedale Abbey Church Appeal Coffee Morning – 7 July 2018

The coffee morning held on Saturday 7 July 2018 at the Coach House Inn in aid of the church repair appeal raised over £400 thanks to the outstanding generosity of all who attended. Then, after counting the bucket of change left by Simon and Nicola, the total came to a staggering £554.86!

Helping to save Rosedale Abbey’s church.

As usual, the organisers are very grateful to Dave Oakey and the team at the Coach House for laying on the coffee and biscuits, to Margaret, Carol and Janet for their customary efficiency in setting up the raffle and to all who contributed and bought cakes in the sale.

There will be a number of other events in support of the church appeal this year so please keep your eyes on this site and social media for more  information and news.

Save Rosedale Abbey Church Appeal Coffee Morning – Saturday 7 July 2018

This coming Saturday’s coffee morning is in aid of the Save Rosedale Abbey Church Appeal and will held in the Coach House Inn between 10.00 and 12.00 am.

A panel from the East Window of St Mary and St Lawrence Church

All the usual attractions will be on offer, including a cake sale, the ever popular raffle and great coffee and biscuits to chat over while supporting this very important cause. So please come along, all are welcome and enjoy the morning in good company.

Walking Festival – Exploring Rosedale’s Wildlife Habitats

On Saturday 23 June 2018 Rosedale’s Updale Natural History Recorder took 11 keen walkers along a journey through the dale visiting various habitats.  Walking alongside hedgerows full of dog rose and walls lined with foxgloves and ferns was a real pleasure.  The route included the river to Low Thorgill Farm, Thorgill and the hillside above Thorgill and the track north of Thorgill.

The banks of the River Seven hosted numerous birds nests including wren, robin, coal tit and dipper.  Trees and shrubs alongside added nests of great spotted woodpecker, blackcap, nuthatch, redstart and green woodpecker.  Further afield were willow warbler and chaffinch.  All but one nest had already hosted a brood this year and were no longer in use or were last year’s.  They gave a great insight in to bird breeding in the dale.  A pair of green woodpeckers were still feeding young in their nest hole high up in an ash tree alongside the river and the group were very lucky to watch one of the young peering out of the hole.  A spotted flycatcher performed what they do best, flitting out from a branch, taking an insect in mid-air and returning to the same perch.  Over the moor a red kite soared high and curlews gave protecting warning calls to their young.

The group visited habitats which favoured some less common flora.  Wet flushes revealed musk, creeping forgetmenot and round-leaved water crowfoot.  Unimproved acidic pasture hosted our locally rare heath spotted orchid (just the one), bitter vetchling, heath speedwell and heath bedstraw.  Close to the moor there was the delicate looking but robust chickweed wintergreen.  Both trailing and slender St John’s wort was encountered on a dry trackside leading up to the moor.  Three sedges included yellow, oval and remote.

It was good to see ringlet, common blue and small heath butterflies but none in great numbers despite the warm weather.

It was a pleasure to lead such an engaging and interested group Updale Natural History Recorder

Musk

Heath spotted orchid

Spotted flycatcher

Young green woodpecker still being fed in nest hole

 

Rosedale Walking and Heritage Festival – 23 to 24 June 2018

The first of the combined Rosedale walking and heritage festival went well, with good weather on both days for the walkers and lots of visitors to the Rosedale History Society and Land of Iron heritage information stands. The combined format was a great success, with a lot of very positive feedback from walkers and visitors, such that the final number for this year’s event are around 121 walkers or 50% more than last year, a great tribute to the tireless efforts of Kate Jones and Ian Thompson in organising and promoting the event, to all those who volunteered their time and expertise as walk leaders and to the Rosedale History Society and the Land Of Iron project for their fascinating stands. Watch out for details of the 2019 festival!

Day 1 – Linda and Tom waiting for the onrush of visitors

Day 1 – The natural history ramblers being briefed .

Day 1 – The tea shop walkers about to set off, led by Ian Thompson on the right

Day 1 – Elspeth Ingleby and her botanists deep in the oat grass

Day 1 – Tom Mutton training up new civil engineers on the Land of Iron stand

Day 1 – Dave Oakey and his beerminders getting ready to meet their group.

Day 1 – the Ale House Walkers warming up at the White Horse Farm Inn. Photo by Dave Oakey

Day 1 – An hour or so later, the Ale House Walkers cooling down with a stash of river temperature beer! Photo by Dave Oakey

The artistic walkers at the start of the Goldsworthy Trail on Day 2 of the festival

Day 2 – Land of Iron Walk Dog Cooling Station – Dunn Carr Bridge

Day 2 – Land of Iron Walk approaching East Mines

Day 2 – Land of Iron Walkers at East Mines

Day 2 – Shirley Drew and Janet Dring send off more treasure hunters around the village

Day 2 -Happy Nordics up on the line – photo by Jane Schofield

Moors Bus News

Rosedale gets weekend buses

On Saturdays and Sundays until the end of September Moorsbus connects Rosedale with the rest of the world.

Not only can visitors from the region get to Rosedale Abbey for its walks, tea rooms, accommodation and other attractions, but Rosedale residents can get to Pickering to connect with other services.

Five services on Saturdays make it possible for locals to get to Scarborough for over a four hour visit. And four services on Sundays connect with Pickering as well as giving locals a direct morning service to Ralph Cross and Danby.

Using the bus also gives locals and visitors some great choices of ‘Buswalks’ – linear walks which save both the cost and problems of taking a car to the start of a walk, and then having to get back to the car at the end.

Moorsbus at Ralph’s Cross

Fares for an all-day, travel-anywhere Moorsbus Rover ticket are £9 or £4.50 for a child. Single fares are also available and Rosedale to the Moors Centre at Danby costs £3, for example. National concessionary passes are accepted on all Moorsbuses. All the details are on www.moorsbus.org or pick up a timetable in shops and libraries.

So this summer, Rosedale is better connected than ever.

Land of Iron Volunteers – 15 June 2018

A band of volunteers were at work in Rosedale Abbey on Friday 15 June, helping to clear one of the fields near the campsite of thistles in order to improve biodiversity in the area.

Dethistling – hard but rewarding work

If you are interested in joining in this important work, learning new skills and meeting other like minded volunteers, then see: http://www.northyorkmoors.org.uk/looking-after/volunteering

 

Nuthatch success

You may recall here in late March a female nuthatch preparing an old woodpecker nest hole to use as her own. On 26th March she was seen taking mud to the old woodpecker hole and applying it in and around the entrance. She also carried wood chips which she stuck in the mud to help bulk it out. She does this to reduce the size of the entrance to minimise the risk of predation or another bird taking over the nest site. Twice a great tit was seen going in only to be chased out very aggressively by the male nuthatch. The male, distinguished by chestnut red flanks, keeps guard during the whole breeding process and will fend off any intruders. During the early stages he sang from just above the nest hole and from the top of the trees. The female continued to ‘mud up’ around the entrance and to watch her size the hole to fit her body exactly was intriguing. She would go in and then squeeze her body out slowly, presumably allowing the wet mud to adjust to her exact body shape.

On two days in April, 14th and 18th they were seen mating on a branch very close to the nest hole. It is not known if she had already started laying eggs by this time. Some birds mate up to 30 days before egg-laying, others just before and some during the egg-laying stage. Nuthatches usually lay 6-8 eggs and the female incubates them after having laid the last egg. Incubation lasts 15-16 days. During this time the male keeps guard and also occasionally feeds her at the nest hole. The female was certainly occupying the nest hole i.e. sitting on eggs, on 27th April when the male was seen to feed her at the nest hole three times at 20 minute intervals. She actually came out to see off a blue tit and went straight back in. Over the incubation period more often he was seen to ‘call for his lady’, peering in the hole and flying off closely followed by her and they would feed away for about 10 minutes before she returned to her duties.

On 12th May the female arrived at the nest hole a number of times with food for her newly hatched nestlings. Each time she was seen to dip down in to the hole and out and away. During these early stages of feeding the young the male wasn’t seen to help but was close by in the trees, occasionally being heard with a contact call or short song. The female occasionally went in the hole completely and brought out a fecal sac for disposal away from the nest, cleaning up after her young. As days passed, the male was also seen to feed the young. Feeding young nuthatches at the nest lasts for 23-25 days.

On 2nd June both adults were feeding at the nest hole and periodically a nestling would appear at the entrance awaiting delivery. Obviously the young were getting big enough to think about leaving. The next day fledging was in progress, with the young being coaxed out by the adults, both having food in their bills. An adult would call at the hole and hold on to the food working back on to a branch with a fledgling following to then receive the morsel. At least four of possibly 6-8 young nuthatches were seen coming out of the nest hole and up the tree trunk flitting about in the branches. The final act was the male entering the hole and exiting alone not to return. All gone. 26th March-3rd June: the privilege was all mine. Nature is wonderful, especially when she lets you in Updale Natural History Recorder

Female nuthatch preparing nest entrance

Mating or more precisely copulation taking place close to nest site

Male nuthatch on duty near nest hole, red flanks clearly visible

Well grown young nuthatch getting close to fledging